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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Jerrold Nadler
Representative (D-NY) member, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 09/12/2012
Unfortunately we have seen repeatedly how even the very minimal restraints congress put on FISA have been violated. We should address those abuses. Congress has an obligation to exert more control over spy agencies than simply to give them a blank check for another five years. The gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Conyers, had an amendment that would have shortened the sunset by two years. But we won't even have a chance to consider it.
Jerrold Nadler
Representative (D-NY) member, House Judiciary Committee
CSPAN 09/12/2012
If the FISA court is just a rubber stamp of the Executive Branch, we and the public should know that. And if the court really does provide meaningful oversight and meaningful limitations on the Executive Branch, we and the public should know that too. But we won't get to discover that or to debate that. Failure to do so is a dereliction of our constitutional duty to protect the constitutional rights of American citizens and the betrayal of our liberties. I urge my colleagues to reject (this legislation.)
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/17/2013
Nadler: The problem obviously with what we're hearing from this panel and what we've heard generally about the relevance standard is that everything in the world is relevant and if we removed that word from the statute, you wouldn't consider or the FISA court wouldn't consider that it would affect your ability to collect meta data in any way whatsoever which is to say you are disregarding the statute entirely.
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/17/2013
James Cole: but the collection is only there and only valuable if it is used and the use is severely restricted. Nadler: The abuse of the statute, the abuse of civil liberties, the abuse of privacy is not only misused but miscollection. If you're collecting information about my telephone when you shouldn't be doing that, that is an abuse even if you file that and never use it.
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/17/2013
Nadler: Statute is of no comfort whatsoever. So to tell me that you go to the FISA court is irrelevant if the FISA court is doing the same abuse of the statute. So can you give me some examples where ongoing bulk collection, I'm not asking about use, has been allowed by virtue of grand jury subpoena without showing the connection between those tangible things and a specific investigation? Chairman: time of the gentleman has expired. James Cole: We'll take that as a question for the record (and depending on the rules of criminal procedure we'll see what we can get back to you.)
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Nadler: This amendment stops the government from misusing section 215 to engage in the dragnet collection of all of our personal telephone records. Congress did not grant the executive the authority to collect everything it wants so long as it limits any subsequent search of that data. This amendment restores the requirement that records stored are relevant to an authorized foreign intelligence or terrorist investigation. It restores the minimal relevant standard required by Congress but ignored
Jerrold Nadler
U.S. Representative, D-New York
CSPAN 07/24/2013
Nadler continued: by successive administrations. No administration should be permitted to operate above or beyond the law as they have done this this respect. I therefore urge all of my colleagues to vote in favor of the Amash/Conyers amendment.
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